Re: OT: Music Monday

#236
R.I.P., Mr. Tambourine Man ...
---------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Rolling Stone > Music > News
Bruce Langhorne, Bob Dylan's 'Mr. Tambourine Man' Inspiration, Dead at 78
Guitarist played critical role on Dylan's 1965 LP 'Bringing It All Back Home'
By Daniel Kreps
10 hours ago (April 17, 2017)

Bruce Langhorne, the folk musician and session guitarist that inspired Bob Dylan's classic song "Mr. Tambourine Man," died Friday at his home in Venice, California. He was 78.

Dylan went electric, invented folk rock and redefined what can be said in a song

Langhorne's friend Cynthia Riddle confirmed the guitarist's death to the New York Times, citing kidney failure as the cause.

Langhorne first recorded alongside Dylan during the sessions for The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan's "Corrina, Corrina" and Dylan's first single "Mixed Up Confusion." He would later play a critical role on 1965's Bringing It All Back Home, where he served as lead guitarist on tracks like "Subterranean Homesick Blues," "Maggie's Farm" and "Outlaw Blues" and provided the notable countermelody to "Mr. Tambourine Man." ...

[youtube][/youtube]



Read more at: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... ad-w477165

Re: OT: Music Monday

#237
JMC-STL wrote:R.I.P., Mr. Tambourine Man ...
---------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Rolling Stone > Music > News
Bruce Langhorne, Bob Dylan's 'Mr. Tambourine Man' Inspiration, Dead at 78
Guitarist played critical role on Dylan's 1965 LP 'Bringing It All Back Home'
By Daniel Kreps
10 hours ago (April 17, 2017)

Bruce Langhorne, the folk musician and session guitarist that inspired Bob Dylan's classic song "Mr. Tambourine Man," died Friday at his home in Venice, California. He was 78.

Dylan went electric, invented folk rock and redefined what can be said in a song

Langhorne's friend Cynthia Riddle confirmed the guitarist's death to the New York Times, citing kidney failure as the cause.

Langhorne first recorded alongside Dylan during the sessions for The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan's "Corrina, Corrina" and Dylan's first single "Mixed Up Confusion." He would later play a critical role on 1965's Bringing It All Back Home, where he served as lead guitarist on tracks like "Subterranean Homesick Blues," "Maggie's Farm" and "Outlaw Blues" and provided the notable countermelody to "Mr. Tambourine Man." ...

[youtube][/youtube]



Read more at: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... ad-w477165
Just imagine how screwed-up things might have turned out if he was an accordion player...

Re: OT: Music Monday

#240
Turk Sanderson wrote:Instead of protest marches, there would have been protest waltzes...Lawrence Welk and Frankie Yankovic would have been hip. Greenwich Village coffee houses would have sounded like an afternoon traffic jam.
You mean protest polkas, and Weird Al Yankovic, and an afternoon traffic jam in Cleveland ...

[youtube][/youtube]

Re: OT: Music Monday

#243
Happy National One Hit Wonder Day!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
From: ConsequenceOfSound.com
The 100 Best One-Hit Wonder Songs
Because sometimes one hit is all you need...
by CoS Staff
on September 20, 2016, 11:00pm

Rank and File finds us sorting through an exhaustive, comprehensive body of work or collection of pop-culture artifacts. This time, we sift through the slush pile and revisit the one-hit wonders we actually love.


If anyone ever asks you to work on a list of the best one-hit wonders, do yourself a favor: Smile, pivot, and flee full speed in the opposite direction faster than you can say, “Oh … my … God, Becky.” We all know what a one-hit wonder is, right? Um, no you actually probably don’t. We’re still not sure that we’ve got it entirely figured out. The standard definition (determined by who, Right Said Fred?) of a one-hit wonder is a band who has cracked the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 only once. What, you had a late-career single make 41? Sorry, thanks for playing, but charting 41 isn’t the same as 40, right? Um, no … maybe? It gets no easier when you have to wade through dozens of other Billboard charts that count for everything except, apparently, determining a one-hit wonder. And what about all those charts in other countries – yeah, we ignored them. Great, this list is making us xenophobic now.

But that’s getting pretty damn technical, and we’re not numbers people here. Because, technically, Beck is a one-hit wonder. As are the Grateful Dead and even Radiohead if they hadn’t snuck in at 37 with “Nude” back in 2008. Very lucky, Mr. Yorke. Can you imagine if you scrolled through a list of the 100 Best One-Hit Wonder Songs and found Beck sitting at the top spot? You’d collectively crash our site’s server in a contest to see which commenter could say the cruelest thing about our music knowledge, mothers, and cats. Hey, leave our pets out of this.

So, that being said, we all know what the real definition of a one-hit wonder is, right? For us, it’s an act who reached their peak popularity with a high-charting hit and then saw that popularity wane and never return once their song ran its course. They’re an artist, band, or group who we’ll forever identify with one song. Did we still have to make some gut calls? Sure. Technically, Twisted Sister are a one-hit wonder, but we all know “I Wanna Rock” as well as “We’re Not Gonna Take It”. Warren Zevon had a lot more going on than his howling “Werewolves of London”, but the charts don’t tell that story. The Verve? Okay, so we pay some attention to the UK charts. You won’t find them here.

But here’s what we really want you to 100% understand about this list and how it differs from so many other one-hit wonder lists. We actually like all these songs. Some we flat-out love. Somewhere along the line, the term “one-hit wonder” became a dubious distinction, a badge of ignominy. Why? Some bands only score one hit, but some of these songs are so good that those artists only needed one hit to secure their permanent place on our playlists. So, sorry, Toni Basil. Apologies, Sir Mix-a-Lot. No dice, Frankie. See ya back in Hollywood. Yeah, we remember you guys, but that doesn’t mean we want to hear your songs anywhere near as often as we do.

So, here they are. The one-hit wonders that we love best. As a cherry, we even picked out a second song we think could’ve been a hit for each act. But again, there’s no shame in having only one hit. After all, these one-hit wonders have something that 99.9% of the acts out there don’t have and never will. That’s right. A hit. ...


Read about & See/Hear the CoS Top 100 One Hit Wonders at: https://consequenceofsound.net/2016/09/ ... der-songs/

Re: OT: Music Monday

#244
JMC-STL wrote:Happy National One Hit Wonder Day!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
From: ConsequenceOfSound.com
The 100 Best One-Hit Wonder Songs
Because sometimes one hit is all you need...
by CoS Staff
on September 20, 2016, 11:00pm

Rank and File finds us sorting through an exhaustive, comprehensive body of work or collection of pop-culture artifacts. This time, we sift through the slush pile and revisit the one-hit wonders we actually love.


If anyone ever asks you to work on a list of the best one-hit wonders, do yourself a favor: Smile, pivot, and flee full speed in the opposite direction faster than you can say, “Oh … my … God, Becky.” We all know what a one-hit wonder is, right? Um, no you actually probably don’t. We’re still not sure that we’ve got it entirely figured out. The standard definition (determined by who, Right Said Fred?) of a one-hit wonder is a band who has cracked the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 only once. What, you had a late-career single make 41? Sorry, thanks for playing, but charting 41 isn’t the same as 40, right? Um, no … maybe? It gets no easier when you have to wade through dozens of other Billboard charts that count for everything except, apparently, determining a one-hit wonder. And what about all those charts in other countries – yeah, we ignored them. Great, this list is making us xenophobic now.

But that’s getting pretty damn technical, and we’re not numbers people here. Because, technically, Beck is a one-hit wonder. As are the Grateful Dead and even Radiohead if they hadn’t snuck in at 37 with “Nude” back in 2008. Very lucky, Mr. Yorke. Can you imagine if you scrolled through a list of the 100 Best One-Hit Wonder Songs and found Beck sitting at the top spot? You’d collectively crash our site’s server in a contest to see which commenter could say the cruelest thing about our music knowledge, mothers, and cats. Hey, leave our pets out of this.

So, that being said, we all know what the real definition of a one-hit wonder is, right? For us, it’s an act who reached their peak popularity with a high-charting hit and then saw that popularity wane and never return once their song ran its course. They’re an artist, band, or group who we’ll forever identify with one song. Did we still have to make some gut calls? Sure. Technically, Twisted Sister are a one-hit wonder, but we all know “I Wanna Rock” as well as “We’re Not Gonna Take It”. Warren Zevon had a lot more going on than his howling “Werewolves of London”, but the charts don’t tell that story. The Verve? Okay, so we pay some attention to the UK charts. You won’t find them here.

But here’s what we really want you to 100% understand about this list and how it differs from so many other one-hit wonder lists. We actually like all these songs. Some we flat-out love. Somewhere along the line, the term “one-hit wonder” became a dubious distinction, a badge of ignominy. Why? Some bands only score one hit, but some of these songs are so good that those artists only needed one hit to secure their permanent place on our playlists. So, sorry, Toni Basil. Apologies, Sir Mix-a-Lot. No dice, Frankie. See ya back in Hollywood. Yeah, we remember you guys, but that doesn’t mean we want to hear your songs anywhere near as often as we do.

So, here they are. The one-hit wonders that we love best. As a cherry, we even picked out a second song we think could’ve been a hit for each act. But again, there’s no shame in having only one hit. After all, these one-hit wonders have something that 99.9% of the acts out there don’t have and never will. That’s right. A hit. ...


Read about & See/Hear the CoS Top 100 One Hit Wonders at: https://consequenceofsound.net/2016/09/ ... der-songs/
Doris Troy's name is on the OHW list, but she sang background on one of the most successful albums of all time...Pink Floyd's DSOTM...and I thank her (even in death) for that.

Re: OT: Music Monday

#245
haha that's so great. love the video for venus, hadn't seen that before. they're just like "ah, fuck the keyboard player, he doesn't need to be on camera. we told him to be on time!" and pilot's "my dick" even made the list. regarding eagle-eye cherry: "The Swedish musician is Neneh Cherry’s sister..." yeah, i don't think he's her sister. mountain was a one-hit wonder?? lol, try telling leslie west that. and dead or alive had a slew of hits. and fuck this guy for even mentioning concrete blonde in this list, they have an incredible catalog. love hurts?? not even remotely nazareth's best song. a shitty pop version of torn at #3?? lol. a very dubious list.

also, fuck articles that should easily be all on one page but blow it out to 11 for the clicks. i hope that site burns to the ground.

Re: OT: Music Monday

#246
T.C. wrote:... also, fuck articles that should easily be all on one page but blow it out to 11 for the clicks. i hope that site burns to the ground.
Same rule should apply to The Capn's "How many Blues fans ..." thread, then.

My personal fave was #72, the Toadies with "Possum Kingdom" from 1994. Stick taps to their bassist, sporting his throwback CHL Fort Worth Fire jersey. Sweet!

Re: OT: Music Monday

#247
JMC-STL wrote:
T.C. wrote:... also, fuck articles that should easily be all on one page but blow it out to 11 for the clicks. i hope that site burns to the ground.
Same rule should apply to The Capn's "How many Blues fans ..." thread, then.

My personal fave was #72, the Toadies with "Possum Kingdom" from 1994. Stick taps to their bassist, sporting his throwback CHL Fort Worth Fire jersey. Sweet!
The Capn's "How many Blues fans ..." thread isn't for beginners ...if someone can't keep up, that's their problem. :bananaride: